13.7 C
Kawartha Lakes
Saturday, April 20, 2024
No menu items!
HomeNews"Wind Phones" Installed At Ken Reid Conservation Area Allow You To Connect...

“Wind Phones” Installed At Ken Reid Conservation Area Allow You To Connect With Loved Ones Who Have Passed Away

KAWARTHA LAKES-Kawartha Conservation is introducing two wind phones at the Ken Reid Conservation Area. The phones, which were installed at the end of April, are part of the organization’s efforts to promote mental health awareness and provide a space for visitors to connect with nature.

Kristie Virgoe, Director of Stewardship and Conservation Lands at Kawartha Conservation, explained the significance of the wind phones.

“We recognize the importance of mental health and the healing power of nature,” said Virgoe, who is also a certified forest therapy guide. “The wind phones provide a unique opportunity for visitors to connect with the natural world, reflect on their thoughts and feelings, and find solace in the wind.”

 

It all began in a small coastal town in Japan called Otsuchi where a phone booth stands alone on a hill overlooking the ocean. But this is no ordinary phone booth. It is known as the “wind phone,” or the “telephone of the wind.”

According to Kawartha Conservation, a wind phone is a place for people to communicate with loved ones who have passed away. It was created by a man named Itaru Sasaki, who lost his cousin in 2010. Struggling with his grief, he decided to create a place where he could “talk” to his cousin and express his feelings. He installed an old phone booth on his property, connected it to nowhere, and began talking to his cousin as if he were still alive.

News of the wind phone quickly spread, and people from all over the world began visiting Otsuchi to use the phone booth. They would sit inside and talk to their loved ones, expressing their emotions and sharing their memories.

Tracy Richardson, Kawartha Lakes deputy mayor and Kawartha Conservation Board of Directors member, also expressed her support for the project.

“I am thrilled that Kawartha Conservation is taking this important step to promote mental health awareness and support visitors to our conservation areas,” she said. “The wind phones are a beautiful and meaningful addition to Ken Reid Conservation Area, and I look forward to seeing how they will benefit our community.

The wind phones will be located on the Dragon Fly Trail and along the Point Loop at Ken Reid Conservation Area, and will be accessible to visitors during regular park hours. The phones will not be connected to any network or service, but visitors are encouraged to speak into the receiver and listen to the sound of the wind. The phones will be available for use throughout the year, but are being introduced in May to coincide with Mental Health Month.

Jack Veitch, the Manager of Community Engagement and Education for the Canadian Mental Health Association, said the introduction of the wind phones at Ken Reid Conservation Area is a testament to the power of nature in promoting mental health and well-being.

“We are delighted to see the introduction of the wind phones at Ken Reid Conservation Area,” he said. “Connecting with nature has been shown to have a positive impact on mental health, and the wind phones offer a unique way to do so. We commend Kawartha Conservation for their commitment to promoting mental health and wellness.

In addition to the wind phones, Kawartha Conservation is also offering a series of forest therapy sessions throughout the month of May, and visitors new and old are encouraged to experience the beautiful healing power of nature by visiting Ken Reid Conservation Area during May.

“I am proud that Kawartha Conservation is taking a leadership role in promoting mental health awareness and providing innovative opportunities for visitors to our conservation areas,” said Robert Rock, Chair of the Kawartha Conservation Board of Directors. “The wind phones at Ken Reid Conservation Area are a perfect example of how we can use our natural resources to enhance the well-being of our community.”

To learn more about upcoming forest therapy events at Ken Reid Conservation Area, and Kawartha Conservation’s other conservation area properties, visit www.kawarthaconservation.com.

 

Don't forget to sign up for our morning newsletter.

Catch up on all the local news while enjoying your coffee.

Most Popular

Kawartha 411